Racial prejudice in the bluest eye

Racism in the bluest eye quotes

Through her novels, Toni Morrison traced the plight of black people who have suffered the inferior social and economic status in a conspicuous culture. The novel shows how Pecola perishes in a community that is plagued by self-hatred. The gender issue therefore becomes an important one in the novel. Geraldine attempts to separate herself and her family from appearing black by straightening her hair, using lotion on Junior's skin to keep it from becoming ashen, and keeping her home immaculately clean. In poor, unkempt Pecola, she sees a type, a class for whom she has only disgust. The narrative structure of The Bluest Eye is important in revealing just how pervasive and destructive social racism is. The novel focuses on intra-racial as well as inter-racial problems. Racism began in America when white masters brought the African slaves in chains and used them as laborers to work on plantation farms to fill their coffers. The Bluest Eye is told from the perspective of nine-year old Claudia Macteer, a young black girl in Lorain, Ohio in the s. She wants the bluest eye. She has given a voice to the black minority. She becomes a reminder of human cruelty and an emblem of human suffering. Her encounter with a fifty-two-year old storekeeper makes her aware that for many people she does not really exist. The novel is an instructive denunciation of the social construction of race.

Pecola stands for the triple indemnity in the female black child: children, blacks, females, and the poor are devalued and pushed to the margins of the already marginalized community.

Through her novels, Toni Morrison traced the plight of black people who have suffered the inferior social and economic status in a conspicuous culture.

critical race theory the bluest eye

Whiteness in The Bluest Eye is associated with beauty, innocence, goodness, cleanliness, and purity. Her ugliness has made them feel beautiful, her suffering has made them comfortable and her silence has given them the opportunity to speak.

racism in the bluest eye pdf

Who told her? Pecola suffers not only because she is black and poor, but also because she is a female. Likewise, Soaphead Church uses his white heritage, place of origin, and educational background to define his "whiteness". The narrative structure of The Bluest Eye is important in revealing just how pervasive and destructive social racism is.

the bluest eye themes pdf

The novel traces the environment that produces this crisis. In poor, unkempt Pecola, she sees a type, a class for whom she has only disgust. Toni Morrison has distinguished herself as an author, editor, and critic who has transformed the American literary setting with her charisma in the Afro - American literary institution.

Race and gender in the bluest eye

This in turn leads him to be somewhat repulsed by women and family, which leads to his alcoholism, which leads to his rape of Pecola. Toni Morrison is a skilled writer. She uses many different writing tools to depict how "white" beliefs have dominated American and African American culture. Maheswari Assistant Professor of English M. The black community wants to conform to white standards of beauty, they desperately want to be accepted by the whites and this internalized racism is the root cause of the central conflict in the novel. These are systems of societal and psychological oppression that have adversely affected the lives of blacks in general and African-American women in particular. Whiteness in The Bluest Eye is associated with beauty, innocence, goodness, cleanliness, and purity. References Morrison, Toni. The novel is an instructive denunciation of the social construction of race. Geraldine attempts to separate herself and her family from appearing black by straightening her hair, using lotion on Junior's skin to keep it from becoming ashen, and keeping her home immaculately clean. Because the novel involves mostly black characters, "whiteness" exists on a spectrum. Claudia explains the reality of her mother and other women in the community. Distinctions are drawn based on the shade of one's skin, the hue of one's eyes, and the texture of one's hair, but when these markers fall short in defining one's race, characters opt for socioeconomic, educational, religious, regional, and hereditary differences to define their "whiteness". The theme of race, and the destructive force of racial self-hatred reach a climax during Pecola's rape. All black women in The Bluest Eye experience dependency, repression, internal racism and alienation.

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